How To Become Certified As A Chaplain

From Rabbi Leonard (Yehuda) Blank MS, BCC
Director of Chaplaincy Commission and External Affairs
Rabbinical Alliance of America/Igud HaRabbonim
 
 
Many people have asked me and other members of the Chaplaincy Commission and RAA presidium how to become a chaplain, where to find chaplaincy positions and so on. Often, I have heard from other rabbis that there are programs that train someone in a matter of days to become chaplains. But Chaplains are Spiritual Care Specialists and the training is much more rigorous: 1600 hours of clinical and classroom training to qualify to get a job to work and an additional 2000 hours to be eligible for certification as a chaplain. Many positions require a chaplain to complete Clinical Pastoral Education -CPE training. Although there can be settings with different requirements, I’m sharing a broad overview.  [...Click headline above for more...] 

Congratulations to the New NYPD Chaplain and Updates from Rabbi Blank

Rabbi Leonard (Yehuda) Blank, MS, BCC Director of the Rabbinical Alliance of America Chaplaincy Commission and External Affairs who was unable to attend this week’s meeting, wishes much success to Iman Dr, Tahir Kukaj NYPD Chaplain. Rabbi Blank before the merge of the three NYC police departments himself was a uniformed police chaplain for the NYC Housing Police. It was truly fitting especially in today environment, to know that our multicultural police department has distinguished members such as Chaplain Kukaj and the other police department chaplains under the leadership of Chief Chaplain Rabbi Dr. Alvin Kass to encourage and foster good and meaningful relations throughout our City of ours including the Jewish Community. Meeting with many of the distinguished members of the Rabbinical Alliance of America only enhances those good relations between our communities and the NYC Police Department. It is also important to note of our pride in having many members of the NYC Police Department who themselves are not only Jewish, but from the Orthodox Jewish communities serving in many capacities. Rabbi Blank on behalf of the Chaplaincy Commission would like to share the following. Attached to this newsletter is a flyer about a special Rabbinic Certificate Program in Gerontology and Palliative Care. Not only does one who completes the program receive a certificate, but can use those credits toward a degree in social work at the Wurzweiler School of Social Work. There will be future information about other educational programs to be announced. We are also putting together a list where CPE Clinical Pastoral Education is being offered in the metropolitan area. Many hospitals, and other medical, hospice related facilities and other chaplaincy positions often prefer to have a chaplain with CPE units of learning. Rabbi Blank is also pursuing other educational and meaningful programs, some of which will be in collaboration with the NCYI and Rabbi Binyamin Hammer. We will also be promoting the Siyum HaShas with important information specifically for Rabbonim of shuls and additional information for the entire RAA/Igud membership. We are looking forward to participating in this magnificent event by Agudas Yisrael. Please contact Rabbi Blank for questions you might have at 917-446-2126 or rablenblank@gmail.com[...Click headline above for more...] 

Rabbis Learn About Self-Care

On Tuesday, May 28, 2019, Lenox Hill Hospital, a world premier medical institution opened its doors to a joint program of the Rabbinical Alliance of America/Igud HaRabbonim (RAA/IGUD), an Orthodox rabbinical association with a membership near 1,000 Orthodox rabbis serving throughout the United States, and the National Council of Young Israel (NCYI), an Orthodox synagogue association with over 130 congregations across America. The symposium, entitled “Mchayil Lchayil, Taking YOUR SELF seriously, THE RABBI and HIS SELF care!”, was geared toward congregational rabbis and institutional chaplains. The symposium reflects the desire of both the RAA/IGUD and the NCYI to collaborate long-term on professional development and training that will enhance the Orthodox rabbi and chaplain. This training focuses on the rabbi’s and chaplain’s need to avoid burnout and to make certain that they are physically and spiritually healthy. A burnt-out rabbi or chaplain is unable to properly tend to the religious and spiritual needs of his congregation and patient. Therefore, the first of this series of professional development focused on staying healthy in order to best answer their calling to serve the community. [...Click headline above for more...] 

The Rabbi and His Self-Care – Taking Good Care of Yourself

The Rabbi and His Self-Care – Taking Good Care of Yourself=&0=&

Spiritual leadership wears many hats and makes many demands on the Rabbi and his family. As first responders, multi taskers, care givers and problem solvers the vocation of rabbinic leadership follows the same path for all of us, sharing, giving, doing, all for others. We understand the commitment as a mitzvah, we saw our parents and rabbeim do it the same way; it is our mesorah, our tafkid, our passion to live, Na’aseh V’nishma. [...Click headline above for more...]